Panzer III

The Panzer III was considered Germany’s best tank, or at least its main weapon for armored warfare at the start of World War II.

IMG_8292

After the jump I’ll look at an early war tank.

The Panzer III and IV were meant to serve side by side.  German doctrine called for the III to be a tank killer, while the IV was optimized for support and indirect fire.  That meant the III had an anti-tank gun, while the IV used a howitzer.  As always happens in war, the actual fighting forced upgrades and reassessments.  In particular, encounters with Soviet T34s led to a more powerful 50 mm gun being mounted on the Panzer III as seen here on an “L” model.  But the bigger shock to the Germans was that their main battle tank was really too small to compete.  The Panzer IV had a bigger turret ring and could mount a bigger gun, so it didn’t take long for the IV to morph into the main battle tank.  But that was just the start of an upward spiral that would lead to the King Tiger.

IMG_8293 IMG_8294

This is a good accompaniment to the Matilda post I put up a couple weeks ago.  Although I can’t swear these two exact tanks ever fought, they are contemporaries on the same battlefield, and both are at the top of their food chains.

IMG_8295 IMG_8296

This Panzer III is from the Tamiya kit.

IMG_8298

Panzer III and Matilda Mk III are contemporaries, and both these tanks fought in North Africa. Although this particular Panzer III, an “L”, is a little more advanced than this Matilda.

IMG_8297

Advertisements

About atcDave

I'm 53 years old and live in Ypsilanti, Michigan. I'm happily married to Jodie. I've been an air traffic controller for 30 years; grew up in the Chicago area, and am still a fanatic for pizza and the Chicago Bears. My main interest is military history, and my related hobbies include scale model building and strategy games.
This entry was posted in Armor, Germany and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Panzer III

  1. Pingback: Panzer IV | Plane Dave

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s